Branch 116 Golf
Web Site

March 28, 2015
Revised: (03/28/15)
 


Al Zavattero
    Golf Chairman

 

 

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                                                                                                                                                    photo by Wayne Cook
At Sequoyah Country Club
As the morning fog lifts, SIR golfers are ready for conquest.
Was it them or the course?

left to right: Frank Crua, Harry Oberle, Terry Sherman,
Carl Langhorst, Don Schroeder, Jim Clizbe

 

TRIVIA FOR TODAY: Sequoyah Country Club is not named after the tree, which is actually spelled Sequoia. It's namesake was a Cherokee Indian who, when the tribe was in Tennessee and Alabama, created an effective writing system. This was the only time in recorded history that a member of a pre-illiterate people independently created an effective writing system. After seeing its worth, the people of the Cherokee Nation rapidly began to use his syllabary and officially adopted it in 1825. Their literacy rate quickly surpassed that of surrounding European-American settlers. A statue of Sequoyah is in the Nation's Capitol.

About SIR Branch 116 Golf

     SIR Branch 116 has an active golf group, including an 18-hole group and a 9-hole group.    We alternate between local courses and playing at courses 10 to 50 miles away.     Our 18-hole golfers are required to be members of the NCGA, (Northern California Golf Association) and therefore receive handicaps used for equitable play between different levels of ability.

     All of our events are listed in our annual Golf Book, the branch newsletter, Trampas Topics, as well as this web site.

     We attempt to provide a satisfying experience on the golf course for all of our golfers, regardless of experience.   Come join us for a good time. 

Golf Advice from the "Pros"
 

Swinging at daisies is like playing electric guitar with a tennis racket:
if it were that easy, we could all be Jerry Garcia.
The ball changes everything.
Michael Bamberger